?

Log in

No account? Create an account

16th October 2017

Reading books I skimmed to write an essay. I would alter a sentence or two, having read these two.

These follow on directly from the previous books in chronological order, with the usual cast of recurring characters - O'Mara, Prilicla, Murchison, along with a large cast of aliens, who may be minor characters but do get proper introductions and speaking parts. Conway interestingly, is frequently mentioned, but almost never actually there, and even when he is there he doesn't get to speak.

The Galactic Gourmet
The Galaxy-famous chef, Gurronsevas - "a massive six-legged alien of considerable dignity", driven by ego and overwhelming pride, arrives at Sector General to improve the hospital food. After creating certain entertaining kinds of chaos, and making himself largely unwelcome on the Station, he is seconded to the ambulance ship Rhabwar: it is not clear whether he is supposed to be useful or is just being quietly removed from the Station while things settle down. In the event he finds that, like his medical colleagues, chefs can employ professional concerns to bond with individuals of other species, and help to improve first contact situations gone somewhat awry.

This was entertaining, in a slightly repetitive fashion: Guerronsevas is a large, ponderous and rather rigid alien learning better, the third in a row, after Cha Thrat and Lioren. Overall there's a good idea here, and White has fun with the standard tropes of Sector General, but it doesn't feel like essential reading.

Final Diagnosis
A change of tack with this one, with protagonist Hewlitt, an Earth Human male, arriving on Sector General as a patient to puzzle the hell out of everybody: the Diagnosticians - including Conway and Thornnastor - can find no physical cause for his enigmatic symptoms; but Lioren, now Padre, and Lieutenant Braithwaite of O'Mara's office can't find anything psychogically wrong either. Hewlitt slowly wends his way through his own and Sector General's pasts, visiting with Hudlars, Kelgians, Chalders and Telfi on his way to a really, really neat ending that pleases me enormously as an idea.

Hewlitt is a rather stuffy and tedious character whose pale, stale, maleness was trying at times, so this was a book that dragged somewhat in the reading; and White still has to explain ideas rather than showing them. I enjoyed meeting the many aliens, and the cat, and I'm glad I read it.




July 2017: This entry was originally posted at https://coth.dreamwidth.org/387044.html where there are comment count unavailable comments. I'm still reading on LiveJournal, but please comment there rather than here.

Profile

coth
Caroline M

Latest Month

October 2017
S M T W T F S
1234567
891011121314
15161718192021
22232425262728
293031